Room 205

Single-Point Rubrics

A couple of weeks ago, I was introduced to the #singlepointrubric. If you’ve never heard of it or used one, Cult of Pedagogy has an informative blog, as well as free templates for download, here.

Here in the lovely state of AZ (where education is…51st in the nation), we are already finished with the first grading quarter of the school year. To wrap up the grading quarter and to formally assess my students’ knowledge over the novel we had just completed (The Adventures of Tom Sawyer), I gave a two-part exam: part one consisted of basic comprehension and recall questions in multiple-choice format; part two consisted of a literary analysis regarding Mark Twain’s view on childhood.

Since I am teaching 8th-graders this year (my first time in middle school – more on that later), I know that individualized feedback is imperative when teaching/correcting writing. However, I also knew that time was of the essence – I needed a method in which I could succinctly provide feedback as well as grade quickly. Enter the single-point rubric.

File Oct 10, 4 14 35 PM

To help me, as I graded, I converted the point value into alpha grade equivalents. I listed those on a small sticky-note that I had hanging in eye-sight, so as I graded, I could quickly convert the alpha grade to numeric.

What I found with using the single-point rubric was that 1. I was able to grade a class of 35 in an hour, and 2. my feedback was concise; I was able to pinpoint exactly where a student fell below or above the standard listed.

This got my brain churning…

When I taught AP Language and Composition the past two years, I was taught to provide JUST the score (0-9 scale) as I graded student essays. The only time feedback was encouraged was on the first timed-write performed in class; from there, students were expected to know where their writing fell short or excelled.

The funny thing about writing, though, is that it REQUIRES – REQUIRES – individualized feedback. So, how can I do this in an AP classroom? Enter the single-point rubric. Again 🙂

Looking at the College Board’s generic scoring guidelines, I developed single-point scoring rubrics for each of the three essays required for the AP Language and Composition exam. I threw in a generic scoring rubric for good measure.

You can now download these rubrics for free in my TeachersPayTeachers store.

What’s your experience with single-point rubrics? Have you used one? Multiple? How have you incorporated them into your classroom? Curious minds want to know ❤

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